General

Violet


Characteristics

Surname: Violets
Latin name: Viola
Other names: Violas
plant family: Violet plants
Number of species: more than 400 species
circulation area: worldwide
original distribution area: probably Mediterranean
Location of the plant: unspecific
Blдtter: depending on the species
Frьchte: small capsule fruits
Blьtenfarbe: violet
Blьtezeit: March - June
Hцhe: 10 - 20cm
Older: 1-2 years
use: Ornamental plant
characteristics: ?

Plant information: Violets

The violet, also called viola, belongs to the family Violaceae, the violet plant. The genus of violets comes from the Mediterranean and today grows mainly in countries of temperate climates. Thus violets occur in most of Europe, North America, Japan and parts of Central America. For centuries, violets have been considered fragrant messengers of spring, as they are among the first flowers to flower after the winter. Especially popular and well-known are the perfume violets and the stepmothers.
Typically, violets grow as herbaceous plants, but they can also form half-bushes. Violets are known not only for their distinctive purple flowers, but also for their distinctive fragrance. The fragrance of violets is used among other things for the production of perfume.
According to Greek mythology, the first violet was created by turning a daughter of the god Atlas of Zeus. Helios, the sun god, fell in love with the lovely girl and tried to catch it with his sunbeams. The daughter fled and asked for help from Zeus, who turned her into a violet and protected her from Helios.
In antiquity, the healing power of violets was used for a wide variety of diseases and disorders. Violets contain, among others, bitter substances, flavonoids, glycosides, saponins and salicylic acid. Because of the special ingredients, the viola has a number of healing effects, but the violets are no longer really used today. The plant is also not suitable for consumption. Mainly Violets serve only as ornamental and garden plant.

Note

This information is for scholastic work only and is not intended to identify edible or inedible plants. Eat or Never use found plants or fruits without appropriate expertise!

Pictures: Violets